Posted in THEY SAY IT BETTER

INCORRUPTIBLE JUDICIARY AS A CATALYST FOR AN EQUITABLE AND PROGRESSIVE SOCIETY

Every year, the Bible Society of Nigeria organises an essay for the members of the National Youth Service Corps. The contest seeks to encourage corp members to lend their voices in “analysing and proffering solutions to some of the socio-economic and political challenges in Nigeria using both biblical and intellectual approaches“.

This year, the title of the contest was, ‘INCORRUPTIBLE JUDICIARY AS A CATALYST FOR AN EQUITABLE AND PROGRESSIVE SOCIETY’.

The winner of this year’s contest, Alabi Rejoice Oluwadamilare, is willing to share the winning essay with us. It is an engaging piece and will definitely be worth your while.

ALABI REJOICE
SOURCE: ALABI REJOICE

For those who think that “all lawyers are liars”, Rejoice admonishes us to think again. In his words,

“…The demonization of the legal profession is in the writer’s opinion partly responsible for the judicial rut this nation is in. By directly and indirectly peddling the misconception that “no Christian can truly be a lawyer”, we sow the seeds of indifference in the young men and women who God intends to be judicial reformers. Since it is only lawyers that become judges and man the entire judiciary, the implication is that the life of Christ and the spirit of true incorruptible justice would continue to elude our judicial system until Christians take the gauntlet and build a new legal profession and by extension, a judiciary anchored on Christ. This writer therefore recommends that more and more of our young people are encouraged to take up the place of God on earth as administrators of justice. We cannot sit back idly and believe that ungodly men whose foundations are laid on faulty principles of selfishness, cronyism and other sharp practices will correct the anomaly of corruption in the judicial system...”

Click here for the entire essay.

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Posted in THEY SAY IT BETTER

#WRITINGGAMESNG 2017

SOURCE: WOLE OLAYINKA

Goal.com, and the University of Sussex created a competition to ‘spur young Nigerians to write using football as a vehicle to explore their imagination.’ The title of this year’s competition, which was open from August 21 to September 11, 2017′ was – “Making Nigerian Football Attractive in a Digital Age”. 

Below, with his kind permission, I am sharing with you the entry of one of the shortlisted finalists. His name is Olawole Olayinka*. 

Wole Olayinka

Digitally Climbing Out of Obscurity

Ade races to the football field after school every day, denying himself the rich curry rice his mother prepares for lunch. He dreams of playing in the English Premier League someday. He is twelve years old. He knows there’s a professional football league in Nigeria but he doesn’t know much more than that.

Ade is not so different from the average Nigerian football fan; largely ignorant of what is happening on the local scene. Nigerian football has lost a lot of its attraction. The proliferation of digital technology has put all the glitz and glamour of foreign football leagues right at our finger tips thus back seating Nigerian football. Continue reading “#WRITINGGAMESNG 2017”

Posted in STRICTLY BLACK AND WHITE, THEY SAY IT BETTER

LAW SCHOOL STARTER PACK 101

Chiamaka Ibeh*

get-excited-i-m-done-law-school
Law school is over

This post is relevant to all law school students especially those who will be in Lagos Campus. Kindly disregard all the scary tales about law school. Just like any phase you have passed through in life, it has its ups and downs, hard times and easy times. You just have to go in prepared, emotionally, mentally, physically and most importantly spiritually. The information contained below is based on the status quo as at the conclusion of the 2016/2017 session and is amenable to changes for the new session. This is merely to guide you and paint a rough picture of what you should expect as you prepare for the Nigerian Law School. Please, adhere strictly to information issued by the Nigerian Law School through its website and other official channels.

  1. REGISTRATION:

This process usually depends on your campus. Word has it that Lagos Campus has the most rigorous registration process. I was in Lagos Campus and I arrived very early on Monday morning to commence the registration because I had been told that the earlier you register, the easier it would be for you to settle in nicely and comfortably.

Tips:

  • Pay your school fees as soon as you can. First of all generate a Remita number like you did when you were paying your application fees. Pay attention to the changes in the information you will be inputting as it will be different since you are paying for school fees and not application fees again. Please be careful as the sum involved is large. There were instances in my set where people were robbed while trying to get their fees to the bank. Do not make it conspicuous that you are carrying a huge sum with you.
  • Be on campus by 8am on the registration days with your proper regulation wear (strictly black and white with jackets, long skirts, black shoes, black belts and all, no stripes, no coloured hair, no bogus earrings etc) and take your passport photographs (usually 12 in number with both black and white and coloured) with the accredited photographers on campus. Plan ahead with your university classmates so you all can be there together and watch out for one another. In my set, Reg Nos 1-16 were mostly from UNILAG with the exception of two or three persons who got lucky. We were able to finish our registration on time and we led others through the entire process.
  • Have all your documents ready before you set out including copies of those you submitted with your application in your faculty that was sent to Abuja. Usually, information about the requirements for registration would come around Saturday evening/Sunday morning, just before resumption on Monday, so you have to be prepared. You should have a photocopy of your notarized Form A1 Part A and B which was submitted to your Faculty and sent to Abuja. If you were not given a photocopy, print out a new one and notarize it in any court near you and make photocopies. Print out your full admission slip, posting slip, law school generated payment receipt and other relevant documents. PLEASE MAKE SURE YOU MAKE AT LEAST 3 PHOTOCOPIES OF EVERY PRINT OUT.
  • Convert your Remita e-receipt to a law school receipt at the Accounts Department. You might be required to pay N6,000 for a bed sheet and a t-shirt via the Remita platform to Nigerian Law School (Lagos Campus). Just have the cash in hand and do not make any payment until you are asked to. Convert the Remita receipt for the bed sheet and t-shirt to a law school receipt as well at the Accounts Department. This is a prerequisite for you to get accommodation after your registration.
  • Collect your yellow form from the registration officers and your access pin which you will take to any cafe in school to fill and print out your student’s bio data form, year book form and other relevant forms. You will be required to upload your passports. Some will be black and white while others will be coloured. Pay attention to the instructions online. Ensure that you get to a cafe on time as there are only 3 on campus and they will be crowded in no time. Sometimes the site goes down and gets crappy, do not be frustrated, just take it easy and report to the IT Department.
  • Print out all the forms and make copies.
  • Take the forms, the yellow form given to you (filled carefully according to the instructions of the registration officers without any cancellation of any kind), the notarized Form A1, your full admission slip, posting slip, receipts and other printouts to the student affairs department for registration. Make sure you arrange these documents according to their instructions. You will get your registration number and you will be assigned to a group here.
  • Proceed to do your biometric data capturing at the IT department or a classroom designated for that purpose.
  • Proceed to do your medical clearance at the clinic with your medical form which you filled at a government hospital and all your printouts including your school fees receipt, passport and other relevant documentation.
  • Proceed to do your hostel registration with the hostel porters and you will be assigned to a room.
  • Make sure you eat well before leaving your house, wear comfortable shoes and have about N10, 000 with you for any expenditure.

PLEASE NOTE that you might not finish the registration process in one day. Mine took two. Also, there might be persons with physical challenges among you, please help them with their registration and throughout their stay on campus. Helping them will not be a burden to you, instead, I promise you that it will be a blessing for you for a lifetime.

  1. TEXTBOOKS AND MATERIALS:

Continue reading “LAW SCHOOL STARTER PACK 101”

Posted in THEY SAY IT BETTER

AN EVALUATION OF THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT, 2011. BY EKPO UDUAKOBONG S.

Abstract

Freedom of Information Act
Source: isdmg.org.ng

The freedom to express one’s self includes the freedom to receive ideas without interference. Access to information is highly invaluable in a democracy hence, the enactment of the Freedom of Information Act by the Nigerian legislature.

The era of shrugging over details we are unsure of is long gone. The Freedom of Information Act now guarantees our access to information of public relevance. Since the enactment of this statute, there has been a very low level of compliance and awareness of its novel provisions. Despite the existence of landmark provisions, there are some areas of this law that need judicial clarification in the court room.

The purpose of this study is to appreciate the Act through its legal and legislative framework an increase the awareness of the public on its right of access to information and recourse to the court in an instance of wrongful denial of such access.

Continue reading “AN EVALUATION OF THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT, 2011. BY EKPO UDUAKOBONG S.”

Posted in THEY SAY IT BETTER

MACRON AND THE LESSONS OF POLITICAL PARTICIPATION AND LEADERSHIP IN CONTEMPORARY NIGERIA

flag, young boy, Nigeria
photocredit: Nigeriagalleria.com

Joshua Onuekwusi Esq.*

For France, 7 May, 2017 will remain a historical date for a country that prides itself in its great history and enlightenment. Emmanuel Jean-Michel Frédéric Macron, a 39 year old relatively unknown political figure hitherto never elected to a political post has been saddled with the momentous responsibility of dragging a nation out of the brim of hostile Islamist insurgency and terrorism, a failing economy and a youthful population that yearns to play a greater role in its national affairs.

The lessons of this political development can be quite enriching to our contemporary Nigeria where in their forties the vast population of its citizenry still questions their role in a society that has self-perpetuated men of yesteryear at the helm of affairs even amidst constant failures in every segment of the fabric that makes up the nation. There has always been the case for youth inclusion in politics and governance. Ironically, while the youths control the majority of votes cast during elections and events leading up to elections, they are actually left with nothing when elections are over.

However a close reflection on Nigerian history will show that the youth has not always been at the back seat of political vehicle in Nigeria. But down recent memory lane, the story is not exactly the same. Yakubu Gowon became a military head of state at age 31, Richard Akinjide became Minister of Education at the age of 32. Audu Ogbeh was a Minister at the age of 35. He is still serving today as a minister of Agriculture under the Muhammadu Buhari government who himself served as a petroleum minister at the age of 35. Continue reading “MACRON AND THE LESSONS OF POLITICAL PARTICIPATION AND LEADERSHIP IN CONTEMPORARY NIGERIA”